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January 19, 2018: Carbon Smart Limited: 2017 ' UK'S GREENEST YEAR TO DATE THANKS TO RENEWABLES

NEWS BITES - PRIVATE COMPANIES

2017 may be blacklisted in many peoples' minds as the year of tedious Brexit negotiations, and Trump withdrawing the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement. However, amid the growing scepticism and uncertainty of 2017, there is a positive to take forward into 2018 - the UK has shone through with its greenest year to date. This is a notable achievement in the country's effort to strive towards sustainability.

Renewable energy is advancing more quickly than ever before, with the UK breaking many clean energy records last year. But how does the UK's renewable energy generation compare to other European countries? And how can your business drive forward the UK's green agenda through renewables?

The UK's progress - 24 hours without coal

On Friday 21st April 2017, the UK had its first continuous 24-hour period of using no coal power since the Industrial Revolution. This is a significant moment in reducing our carbon emissions and is largely due to the increase in energy production from renewable sources. It was followed by the blustery and bright day of 7th June, when more energy was generated from wind, nuclear and solar than gas and coal combined.

On Sunday 11th June, now known as 'Stunning Sunday', the carbon intensity of power production fell below the 2030 target of 100g CO2 per kWh for the first time ever. This is a glimpse into the future of energy generation. Throughout 2017, intensity continued to fall, but the UK still has a way to go to achieve the 2030 target.

Wind power in the UK

The UK mainly produces renewable energy through wind, solar, wave and bioenergy. The leading renewable source of energy in the UK is wind power, producing 12.8% of the UK's energy. 7.5% of this is on-shore and 5.3% off-shore. Due to high average wind speeds, the UK is the best-positioned country in Europe for wind power.

The largest wind farm in the UK is Whitelee Wind Farm, opened in 2009, consisting of 215 turbines able to power just under 300,000 homes. It has become an eco-tourist attraction, raising awareness of the importance of renewable energy in the UK. Interest in this site should lead to further investment in renewable energy implementation.

European renewable energy leaders to watch

Although the UK has come on leaps and bounds with renewable energy generation, Sweden is top of the league, not just as a European leader, but the world leader in renewables.

Sweden has set a global example; setting a target for 100% renewable energy production by 2040, aiming to be the world's first fossil fuel free nation. In 2016, 52% of Sweden's power came from renewable energy sources (This figure was only 25% for the UK.). Unlike the UK, where we largely use wind turbines, the majority of Sweden's renewable energy comes from hydropower, with over 2,000 hydropower plants nationally.

The Netherlands have big renewables plans - literally! They plan to build the largest offshore wind farm on Earth by 2027. This would consist of a 2.3 square mile artificial island in the North Sea for 10,000+ wind turbines. In order for the UK to keep up when it comes to renewables, the UK government needs to implement a more ambitious National Renewable Energy Action Plan in the near future.

INDEX

SECTION 1 CARBON SMART LIMITED FINANCIALS

SECTION 2 CARBON SMART LIMITED PROFILE

SECTION 3 OTHER NEWS: 2018

SECTION 4 PRESS RELEASES: 2016

SECTION 5 OTHER NEWS: 2016

SECTION 6 CARBON SMART LIMITED TOP MANAGEMENT

SECTION 1 CARBON SMART LIMITED FINANCIALS

Carbon Smart Limited for period ending 31 March, 2016

All values are in GBP

Net Worth 171,730

Working Capital 53,092

Total Assets 541,595

Total Liabilities 366,985

Net Assets 174,610

SECTION 2 CARBON SMART LIMITED PROFILE

2.1 ACTIVITIES

Carbon Smart have been providing sustainability consultancy services since 2007. We deliver innovative and practical solutions to a variety of organisations, each with their own sustainability challenges and objectives. Our clients choose us because of our credibility, flexible approach, focus on direct business benefits, and our skilled, experienced and passionate team of consultants.

Carbon Smart are part of the BPR group along with Secure Paper and Paper Round. Having their support and expertise on-hand has enhanced Carbon Smart's delivery of waste management and recycling projects immeasurably.

2.2 SUMMARY

Website: http://www.carbonsmart.co.uk

SECTION 3 OTHER NEWS: 2018

January 19: Carbon Smart Limited: 2017 ' UK'S GREENEST YEAR TO DATE THANKS TO RENEWABLES

2017 may be blacklisted in many peoples' minds as the year of tedious Brexit negotiations, and Trump withdrawing the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement. However, amid the growing scepticism and uncertainty of 2017, there is a positive to take forward into 2018 - the UK has shone through with its greenest year to date. This is a notable achievement in the country's effort to strive towards sustainability.

Renewable energy is advancing more quickly than ever before, with the UK breaking many clean energy records last year. But how does the UK's renewable energy generation compare to other European countries? And how can your business drive forward the UK's green agenda through renewables?

The UK's progress - 24 hours without coal

On Friday 21st April 2017, the UK had its first continuous 24-hour period of using no coal power since the Industrial Revolution. This is a significant moment in reducing our carbon emissions and is largely due to the increase in energy production from renewable sources. It was followed by the blustery and bright day of 7th June, when more energy was generated from wind, nuclear and solar than gas and coal combined.

On Sunday 11th June, now known as 'Stunning Sunday', the carbon intensity of power production fell below the 2030 target of 100g CO2 per kWh for the first time ever.

SECTION 4 PRESS RELEASES: 2016

January 04: Carbon Smart Limited: New circular economy package will mean changes for businesses

What is a circular economy?

Circular economy, as opposed to linear economy, tries to optimise usage of materials and resources to minimise the amount of loss throughout their life cycle. It can include ecodesign, industrial symbiosis, recycling and reuse, collaborative economy, new business models, etc.

Circular economy is a great opportunity to reduce emissions and costs, create jobs and develop innovation and technology, as well as reduce raw materials scarcity. In 2014 the EU published a package of targets and measures to develop a circular economy across Europe. This original package was scrapped with the promise that a more ambitious one would follow.

The new circular economy package, released in early December 2015, has disappointingly less teeth than its predecessor in terms of targets: the municipal waste recycling target has gone from 70% to 65% by 2030 and the commitment to reduce food waste by 30% between 2017 and 2025 has been removed altogether. A comparison of the two packages also shows potentially 110,000 fewer jobs will be created.

There is some good news: the new package wants to prevent programmed obsolescence of products - a topic that wasn't tackled by the previous one. It also encourages more reuse of products like electrical appliances, textiles and furniture. Despite these new adjustments, it is a shame to see that a year of reflection has mellowed the Commission rather than spurred it to greater action.

But how will it affect business across the EU over the next few years?

Product-selling companies will no doubt need to adapt to forthcoming legislation in certain areas like packaging: in its timetable of actions, the Commission included measures on improved date marking on products (to be taken forward in 2017), increased recycling targets for packaging materials as set out in revised waste proposals, action on false green claims (to be taken forward in 2016), and product environmental footprints to communicate environmental information (to be taken forward in 2016 onwards).

The actual products themselves could be required to change, with plans for the substitution of hazardous substances support for SMEs (to be taken forward in 2018), increased recycled content in products and an independent testing programme on planned obsolescence (to be taken forward in 2018).

The package also calls for new incentives and requirements for Member States to provide economic instruments like taxation, so product prices reflect environmental costs.

Despite some disappointing figures, the package still represents a great opportunity for businesses and sets out funding that should help with the transition, and support new projects to come off the ground: important research and innovation funding will become available and the Cohesion Policy funds will provide support to improve production processes, product design and SMEs.

The package will now be reviewed by the European Parliament and European Council along with other legislative proposals to amend the Directive on Waste, Directive on Landfill, Directive on Packaging Waste and Directive on Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment to reach an agreement over the course of the next year.

SECTION 5 OTHER NEWS: 2016

December 22: Carbon Smart Limited; 5 New Year's Resolutions for a better world

Come January 1st, most of us will make big promises to ourselves in the effort to make a better us. More often than not, these resolutions are a just a distant memory a month later. So, at Carbon Smart, we encourage you to do something a little different in 2017. Rather than going for the same old 'I will go to the gym this year', or 'I will stop drinking so much' resolutions in the pursuit for a better you, why not try and help create a better world with your New Year's resolutions?

Here are our top 5 picks for New Year's resolutions that will help you and the planet.

Eat less animal products While meat consumption continues to rise exponentially globally, people are becoming more aware of the damaging environmental and social effects the animal agriculture industry has. Not only is the meat industry responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than all global transport (yes, that's cars, busses, trains, boats, and aeroplanes), but a diet based on animal proteins is a leading cause of food insecurity. This is because animal products are far less efficient than plant foods, as they require considerably more land, water and grains to produce.

You don't have to switch to being vegan on January 1st (unless you want to!), but small changes to your diet could make a big difference.

December 07: Carbon Smart Limited: Top 5 guerrilla renewables trends from 2016

Working on renewables projects this year, with the likes of ASOS, Dentsu Aegis Network and South East London Community Energy, has revealed a number of interesting developments across the sector. Not just the headline-grabbing, international energy policies or political horse-trading, but also significant breakthroughs in key technologies and renewables being embedded at all levels of policy development, commercial operations and community life.

Here's five trends that may have gone under the radar - but I think will be increasingly significant in 2017.

1) Renewables in the board room

In my work with businesses of all sizes this year, there's been a growing interest in accounting for their commitment to renewables, and reporting back on the impact that self-generation and green tariffs have on the bottom line. We advised Dentsu Aegis Network on setting realisable targets for decarbonising their electricity supply, and are also quantifying the benefits of their existing self-generation for a national skin care manufacturer in their annual report. RE100 reached 83 members this year - the business case for renewables continues to strengthen.

2) Marine surfacing

Could 2016 be the year marine power starts to climb out of the valley of death?! I think so.

November 17: Carbon Smart Limited; The click that makes a difference

With Christmas around the corner, suppliers are ramping up production, retailers are introducing extra shifts and customers, wish list ready, are starting to buy presents for their nearest and dearest. Online shopping is a great way to avoid the hustle and bustle of after work shopping - a gruelling experience for many. Research also suggests, that if you don't have loads of failed deliveries and you don't return everything you buy, online shopping can be a more sustainable method of shopping.

However, did you know that your choice of delivery method you opt for will have a considerable impact on the environment? Here's why:

Typically, standard delivery for UK and Europe is transport by road. With standard delivery third party carriers have the time to transport the goods to their main hubs and distribute them from there. However, when you select express, and most certainly next day, road - HGV (heavy goods vehicle) - transport is just not fast enough. So, then there are two options: express delivery vans and flights.

Express delivery vans bypass the hubs and get the orders straight from the retailer to the customers. The vans are smaller and with less goods being transported, meaning that the journey is also more carbon intensive per item transported.

November 10: Carbon Smart Limited: My top 5 tips for scope 2 dual reporting success

For global organisations, scope 2 dual reporting can be nothing short of a nightmare. The guidance is complicated, the terminology unfamiliar and the global availability of information hugely variable. Organisations risk material misstatement of their market-based emissions if they don't get their approach right.

With all these challenges at play, it can be tempting for environmental reporting managers to request as much utilities billing / evidence as possible from regional reporting teams and attempt to co-ordinate market-based reporting from the centre. This is a common and costly mistake for a few reasons - the time consumed in trying to process high volumes of evidence, the challenge of translation, and lack of understanding of the local energy landscape.

So here are my top five tips for global organisations trying to source market-based conversion factors:

Empower each market - your regional reporters can be your local experts; with the right training regarding the conversion factor hierarchy and acceptable quality criteria they can, and should be, responsible for retrieving the required market-based factors

Provide context - invite regional reporting representatives to a training workshop - help them to understand what market-based reporting is, the benefits of getting it right, and your organisations' wider strategic energy roadmap

Start with the basics - some regional reporters may never have seen their utilities bills, or know where to find them.

October 13: Carbon Smart Limited: More plastic than fish in our oceans by 2050

Recent aerial surveys of the great Pacific garbage patch by the Ocean Cleanup have revealed just how extensive plastic pollution is in our oceans, with large islands of debris now visible from space. The environmental implications of plastic use on a global scale have, for the most part, not been considered until recently, which has led to the situation whereby The World Economic Forum predicts that by 2050, there will be more plastic in our oceans than fish.

Plastic waste is not only an environmental concern, it is an economic one. A recent report published by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation found that after just a single use, 95% of the material value of plastic packaging ($80-120 billion) is lost to the economy. This represents a disconnect between the ambitious internal recycling targets of organisations and low capture rates seen on a global scale.

It is thought that 32% of all plastic packaging escapes collection, and of the material that is captured by waste infrastructure, only 14% is recycled. While the high functionality and low cost of plastic has made us dependent on it for some of our most basic needs, designing better products that enable society to move beyond plastics is a necessary step along the path of responsible consumption.

Over the past few years, entrepreneurs around the world have designed new materials with strong environmental credentials to replace plastics.

September 29: Carbon Smart Limited: Resource efficiency toolkit update

Good news for businesses in the North West - Carbon Smart has just completed work with Business Growth Hub (BGH) to update the award-winning Online Efficiency Toolkit they use with the latest greenhouse gas conversion factors. This ensures that SMEs working with BGH receive accurate and up-to-date figures on environmental savings from efficiency improvements.

As part of a host of environmental business services offered by BGH, the Efficiency Toolkit allows businesses to track opportunities for investment, such as retrofit of LED lighting systems and other low carbon technologies, or replacement of raw materials in a manufacturing process with a recycled alternative. The Toolkit calculates paybacks and carbon emissions savings so businesses can prioritise the most suitable opportunities. Carbon Smart has used their industry expertise to ensure the Toolkit is accurately updated with the newest available Defra 2016 conversion factors and latest energy and water prices.

Carbon Smart has also analysed the current and future environmental reporting and policy landscape to assist BGH in understanding what type of support SMEs may need in the coming years. This allows BGH to put steps in place now, to ensure SMEs are prepared for their future obligations and further growth opportunities.

Rebecca Chedd from BGH said: "Carbon Smart helped us to update our toolkit and provided a detailed review of the greenhouse gas reporting and energy regulation landscape.

September 21: Carbon Smart Limited: Greenhouse Gas reporting to reflect natural gas tariffs containing biomethane

Companies that report their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in line with the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, a global standard on how to measure, manage and report on GHG's, can now reflect their decision to purchase a natural gas tariff containing biomethane through reduced scope 1 emissions.

In the UK, natural gas providers can include biomethane within their natural gas mix and evidence it's presence through the Green Gas Certification Scheme (GGCS), which issues Green Gas Certificates (GGCs) accordingly. As with Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGOs) for renewable electricity generation, the issuing of the GGCs tracks biomethane through the supply chain and prevents double counting by multiple suppliers. The biogenic nature of biomethane means that businesses purchasing gas from these certified sources can attract a net zero (or near zero) emissions factor in company reporting.

This announcement follows the publication of the GHG Protocol's Scope 2 Guidance published in 2015, which has enabled businesses to reflect the renewable sources present in the fuel mix of their chosen electricity suppliers.

For businesses where high natural gas consumption is a necessity for heating, processing and manufacturing, this approach provides the opportunity to reduce emissions through procurement, as well as through traditional energy efficiency methods.

September 14: Carbon Smart Limited: Modern Slavery statement - the clock is ticking

On the first anniversary of the Modern Slavery Act (MSA), Theresa May, Prime Minister and author of the Act, stated that "Britain will once again lead the way in defeating modern slavery and preserving the freedoms and values that have defined our country for generations" (BBC). The UK government appears very serious about an issue that will not go away without significant action from UK businesses.

As we head towards the end of September, an increasing number of UK businesses are facing compliance with the Act. It requires larger businesses to publish a statement that confirms the steps taken to ensure that slavery and human trafficking are not taking place in the business or in any supply chain, or alternatively to declare that no steps to confirm the existence of slavery or trafficking have been taken. Faced with this challenge, many businesses that have taken first steps to comply have produced 'holding statements', high level overviews of a general approach or indeed statements of intent. In many cases, this amounts to a 'wait and see' approach; producing a statement without really looking at supply chain risks and waiting to see what competitors, peers and indeed NGOs do next.

Why should businesses avoid a shortcut approach? There are three main reasons:

Modern slavery is likely to exist in most supply chains - research from Ashridge suggests that about 70% of CEOs think slavery is present in their supply chain, some estimates have this higher still.

SECTION 6 CARBON SMART LIMITED TOP MANAGEMENT

William Swan, Chairman

One of the founders of Carbon Smart, William holds a degree in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University and has many years experience of large scale environmental programme delivery. His clients have included WPP, National Magazines, The Financial Services Authority, DEFRA and London Borough of Bromley. William holds a number of directorships in the environmental field and maintains active links with several high profile consultancies and charities in the sector. His expertise is in waste, recycling and fleet management. William leads the development of scientific policy at Carbon Smart.

Ben Murray, Managing Director

Ben has worked for over 16 years in business and sustainability consulting, delivering insight and guidance to a wide range of organisations seeking to improve their performance, reduce costs and gain competitive advantage. With deep experience of both strategy development and implementation programmes, Ben has worked with clients such as Defra, Royal Bank of Scotland, Lloyds of London, WRAP, Deloitte, Iron Mountain, British American Tobacco, The Commonwealth Secretariat, Aegis Media, The British Printing Industries Federation and The Greater London Assembly.

Ben's guiding principle is that sustainability is a lens for looking again at business - done right, it can drive innovation, efficiency, deeper customer relationships and better staff engagement. Sooner or later every business will need to address sustainability to survive.

Ben speaks regularly at a wide range of conferences and events and contributes opinion and articles to the sustainability press. An engineering graduate from the University of Birmingham, he is Carbon Smart's Managing Director and has led Carbon Smart for the last five years.

Alison Roe, Director

A founder of Carbon Smart and a Director of Paper Round Ltd, Alison read Soil and the Environment at Reading University. Alison has over 12 years of experience of designing and implementing environmental programmes for her clients.

Alison has worked with organisations such as Transport for London, Arup, British Airways, London Borough of Islington, Ministry of Justice and AMEC Facilities. Alison's expertise is in waste, recycling and staff engagement and communication programmes.

Louise Quarrell, Director

Louise leads Carbon Smart's delivery service and brings with her extensive experience in managing the end-to-end lifecycle of environmental projects from conception to action, in both the private and public sectors. Some of her clients include: Gala Coral, Scottish and Southern Energy, E.ON, Mirror Group News, Rathbone Brothers Plc, EST, DECC, Defra, and Islington Council.

Louise is an MSc graduate from Manchester University and before joining Carbon Smart was Head of Environmental Services at Heston Lowe consultancy. Previous to this she was responsible for project delivery for the UK arm of Cool nrg, an international company specialising in mass-scale energy efficiency campaigns.

Liudmila Rastorgueva, Finance Manager

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